[Zurück]


Vorträge und Posterpräsentationen (mit Tagungsband-Eintrag):

G. Liedl, R. Pospichal:
"Simulation of laser multi-beam interference patterns for nanostructuring of materials";
Vortrag: COMEC 2012, Cayo Santa Maria, Cuba; 05.11.2012 - 08.11.2012; in: "COMEC VII Conferencia Internacional de Ingenieria Mechánica", (2012), ISBN: 978-959-250-757-9; 10 S.



Kurzfassung deutsch:
Nanostructuring of materials has developed into an interesting possibility for the modification of surfaces. As an example, biomimetic surfaces with ordered structures in the nanometer range show super-hydrophobicity or self-cleaning properties. Several different production methods exist, like nanoimprint lithography or electron beam lithography and others. Compared to other well established production methods, laser interference lithography (LIL) is a single-step process which combines high efficiency with relatively low fabrication costs. As a non-contact processing tool, LIL is able to ablate different materials, like polymers, metals and even ceramics without tool wear. Furthermore, ultra-short pulse laser systems allow processing of moving workpieces without any motion blur due to the short interaction time. In any case, LIL patterning of materials in order to mimic biological surfaces requires the interference of at least two laser beams with well defined orientation, polarisation, phase relation and intensity. Periodicity of the intensity distribution depends on the wavelength and the angle between interfering laser beams. Depending on desired surface structures, interference of two or more laser beams is needed to generate the required intensity distribution for nanostructuring of surfaces. Emanating from biological multi-functional surface structures, different laser beam configurations have been calculated to customize interference patterns for the production of biomimetic surfaces. Examples of surface profiles with hydrophobic behavior have been taken from the literature. In a next step, laser intensity distributions have been calculated which mimic inversely the desired structures. It is assumed that the calculations will help to reduce the number of required experiments significantly.

Kurzfassung englisch:
Nanostructuring of materials has developed into an interesting possibility for the modification of surfaces. As an example, biomimetic surfaces with ordered structures in the nanometer range show super-hydrophobicity or self-cleaning properties. Several different production methods exist, like nanoimprint lithography or electron beam lithography and others. Compared to other well established production methods, laser interference lithography (LIL) is a single-step process which combines high efficiency with relatively low fabrication costs. As a non-contact processing tool, LIL is able to ablate different materials, like polymers, metals and even ceramics without tool wear. Furthermore, ultra-short pulse laser systems allow processing of moving workpieces without any motion blur due to the short interaction time. In any case, LIL patterning of materials in order to mimic biological surfaces requires the interference of at least two laser beams with well defined orientation, polarisation, phase relation and intensity. Periodicity of the intensity distribution depends on the wavelength and the angle between interfering laser beams. Depending on desired surface structures, interference of two or more laser beams is needed to generate the required intensity distribution for nanostructuring of surfaces. Emanating from biological multi-functional surface structures, different laser beam configurations have been calculated to customize interference patterns for the production of biomimetic surfaces. Examples of surface profiles with hydrophobic behavior have been taken from the literature. In a next step, laser intensity distributions have been calculated which mimic inversely the desired structures. It is assumed that the calculations will help to reduce the number of required experiments significantly.

Schlagworte:
interference, laser


Elektronische Version der Publikation:
http://publik.tuwien.ac.at/files/PubDat_211750.pdf


Erstellt aus der Publikationsdatenbank der Technischen Universitšt Wien.